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Resource listing - UK Legislation & Law

1. What equality law means for you as an employer: when you recruit someone to work for you.

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides will support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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2. What equality law means for you as an employer: working hours, flexible working and time off. July 2011

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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3. What equality law means for you as an employer: pay and benefits.

3. This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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4. What equality law means for you as an employer: training, development, promotion and transfer. July 2011 4. Equality Act

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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5. What equality law means for you as an employer: managing workers.

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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6. What equality law means for you as an employer: dismissal, redundancy, retirement and after a worker has left.

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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7. Good equality practice for employers: equality policies, equality training and monitoring.

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

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Equality Act 2010: Summary guidance on employment

This summary guide is part of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission (the Commission) to explain equality rights and duties. These guides support the implementation of the Equality Act 2010.

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Equality Act 2010: Summary guidance on services, public functions and associations

This guidance applies to England, Scotland and Wales. It draws on the Services, Public Functions and Associations Code of Practice. The guide is based on equality law as it was at 31 March 2011. You should check with the Commission in case it has been replaced by a more recent version.

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Equality Act Summary - The Charity Commission

Equality Act Summary Guidance Who can benefit from Charities? A summary of how to avoid discrimination under the Equality Act 2010 when defining who can benefit from a charity

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Making Sure the Care Act Works - Easy Read document

An introduction to The Care Act - an easy read version

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TUC - Guide to Equality Law

Everyone should have the same rights at work. Yet women are still paid on average 19% less than men and part-time workers are paid 41% less than full-timers. Disabled people are twice as likely to be unemployed as non-disabled people.

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Disability Resource Centre 2012 -  The Disability Resource Centre is a Registered Charity (No 1034581) and a Company Limited by Guarantee (No 2897250)