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Resource listing - Disability Hate Crime

CPS Policy for prosecuting cases of Disability Hate Crime

1.1 This policy statement explains the way that we, the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) deal with cases of disability hate crime. 1.2 We are publishing this statement because we want disabled victims and witnesses and their families and communities, as well as the general public, to be confident that the CPS understands the serious nature of this type of crime. Feeling and being unsafe or unwelcome – from shunning or rejection to violence, harassment and negative stereotyping – has a significant negative impact on disabled people’s sense of security and wellbeing. It also impacts significantly on their ability to participate both socially and economically in their communities.

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DHC INFORMATION (from Disability Hate Crime - Guidance on the distinction between vulnerability and hostility in the context of crimes committed against disabled people

Section 146 Criminal Justice Act 2003

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Disability Hate Crime - Guidance on the distinction between vulnerability and hostility in the context of crimes committed against disabled people

This additional guidance should be read in conjunction with theCPS Policy for Prosecuting Cases of Disability Hate Crime, the CPS Guidance on Prosecuting Cases of Disability Hate Crime (both of which were published in 2007) and the speech made by the then DPP, Sir Ken MacDonald QC in October 2008 (Annex A). This guidance deals with crimes committed directly against disabled people, but it should also, where relevant, be read in the context of crimes committed against people who work with or are connected with disabled people. Not every crime committed against a disabled person is a disability hate crime for the purposes of s.146 Criminal Justice Act 2003, but many more are than are currently being identified by police or prosecutors. Although the vulnerability of a victim is an aggravating factor leading to enhanced sentences in any event, where there is an extra factor of hostility based on disability, it is important that this is identified and the court invited to apply the provisions of s.146 so that the offence is properly dealt with for what it is - a hate crime.

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Disability Hate Crime: How to Get Involved Guide

All people in the UK have the inherent right to equality, freedom, dignity and justice and individuals are given protection against violations of those rights under United Nations Human Rights instruments and the Human Rights Act. Hate Crime is another important route within the justice system for redressing wrongs.

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Disability-related harassment: the role of public bodies A qualitative research report

Equality and Human Rights Commission Research report 78 Wendy Sykes, Carola Groom and Philly Desai Independent Social Research

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Disabled people’s experiences and concerns about crime

Equality and Human Rights Commission Briefing paper 3 Analysis of the British Crime Survey 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10 Andrew Nocon, Paul Iganski and Spyridoula Lagou

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Draft Terms of Reference for our Inquiry into the elimination of disability related harassment, and consultation on these terms

Draft Terms of Reference for our Inquiry into the elimination of disability related harassment, and consultation on these terms • Definitions • Geographical scope • Terms of reference • Give us your views

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GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER

Disabled people’s experiences of hate crime in the UK Written by Katharine Quarmby

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Getting Away with Murder: Disabled people’s experiences of hate crime in the UK Easy Read Summary

This report is about hate crime against disabled people.

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Hidden In Plain Sight

EHRC Report 2011 Inquiry into disability-related harassment

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Disability Resource Centre 2012 -  The Disability Resource Centre is a Registered Charity (No 1034581) and a Company Limited by Guarantee (No 2897250)