You are here:

Resource List

Information Assistant – HELP! For Disabled People Project

Job description and Person Specification for Information Assistant – HELP! For Disabled People Project / March 2017

Download resource

(1) Disability Equality

The aim of this leaflet is to outline what “disability equality” means to disabled people and their organisations. When we discuss the lives of disabled people one of the things which comes across very early on is the fact that many words we use have more than one meaning. It is hoped that this leaflet will shed some light on why this situation exists.

Download resource

(10) Further Information

Where to Get Further Information? These links are of selected websites addressing the topic headings. They are valid as of April 2010. We have selected sites and articles considered useful or interesting; alternative information and views do exist. An on-line search is likely to produce further information.

Download resource

(2) Introduction to the Equality Act 2010

The Equality Act replaces existing anti-discrimination laws – including the DDA 2005 - with a single act. It simplifies the law, removing inconsistencies, and makes it easier for people to understand and comply with. It also strengthens the law in important ways to help tackle discrimination and inequality. The main provisions came into force in October 2010. This pamphlet outlines the framework of the Equality Act and its key concepts. It will also offer a brief introduction to Parts of the Act covered by the training offered by the Hitting Walls or Building Bridges? project.

Download resource

(3) Human Rights and Disabled People

The Human Rights Act is about giving further effect to rights in the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). And it is about respecting your rights. But it is important to understand that the Act, like the ECHR, aims to ensure that not just your, but everyone’s, rights are properly respected.

Download resource

(4) Disabled People, Taxis and Minicabs

Good Customer Care starts from the moment the customer calls the taxi or minicab company. A quality service meets all the needs of each customer. The same quality of service should be offered to all customers - disabled people’s money is as good as everyone else's! We all have the right to expect to be treated with courtesy however many disabled people have, at some time, experienced well-intentioned but clumsy assistance that caused them discomfort and pain, or even sheer terror. There should be good customer relations between the driver and the customer - talking to the customer to check what they need will make it quick and easy to give them a better service. Everyone has the right to have a safe and comfortable journey. This pamphlets looks at how taxi and minicab companies and offer good customer care and avoid discriminatory policies and practice.

Download resource

(5) Harassment: if you're a disabled person

Harassment is any behaviour which causes distress or alarm, and can range from verbal abuse to violence and assault.

Download resource

(6) Mind Your Language

Language is important to us all because it helps to convey ideas and build up images. When it comes to speaking about ‘disability’ or ‘disabled people’ too many people still employ language which encourages people to work with negative and misleading stereotyped images of disabled people. Disabled people’s experiences of living with impairment vary greatly; therefore, the use of emotive language often distorts the reality of these experiences. By asking people to ‘mind your language’, disabled people are not trying to enforce the straight jacket of ‘political correctness’, but rather to encourage people to portray them in a more meaningful and realistic way.This Information Leaflet offers some useful suggestions on how to avoid misrepresenting disabled people.

Download resource

(7) What are Reasonable Adjustments?

This leaflet will outline what is meant by the concept ‘reasonable adjustment’ and the legal responsibilities service providers and employers have under the Equality Act 2010.

Download resource

(8) Are You Being Served?

This pamphlet is part of a series called ‘Know My Rights’ and has been produced as part of the Hitting Walls or Building Bridges? project. Information in this pamphlet should be read in conjunction with pamphlet 2 ‘An Introduction to the Equality Act 2010’. The pamphlet has been designed for organisations of and for disabled people and individual disabled people. It aims to give them the information they need to support disabled people wishing to get equal access to services.

Download resource

(9) Danger at Work

The central aim of this pamphlet is to investigate disabled people’s rights in terms of employment opportunities. It will focus upon two main issues: 1) Barriers to getting a job and 2) Barriers at work The pamphlet considers a range of barriers that may exist for disabled people and the type of measures that ought to be taken into consideration in order to remove these barriers. It is hoped that disabled people and those that support disabled people into employment will use this pamphlet to raise concerns with potential and existing employers. We would also recommend that this pamphlet is read alongside the Introduction to the Equality Act 2010 (Pamphlet 2) and the Equality and Human Rights Commission’s Code of Practice on Employment. The format of this pamphlet is taken from work undertaken by Sue Arthur and Gerry Zarb in 1995 when the Disability Discrimination Act was first introduced. It has been adapted to address changes in the law and support available.

Download resource

1. What equality law means for you as an employer: when you recruit someone to work for you.

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides will support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

Download resource

2. What equality law means for you as an employer: working hours, flexible working and time off. July 2011

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

Download resource

25 Years of Disability West Midlands - part 1

In celebration of DWM's 25th birthday, Pinpoint editor Peter Millington, turned back the clock.

Download resource

25 Years of Disability West Midlands - Part 4

25 Years of Disability West Midlands - part 4

Download resource

25 Years of Disability West Midlands - part three

25 Years of Disability West Midlands - 1977-2002 (Part three)

Download resource

25 Years of Disability West Midlands - Part two

Part two of the history of Disability West Midlands 1977 - 2002

Download resource

25 Years of Disability West Midlands Part 5

25 Years of Disability West Midlands A Brief History — Part Five

Download resource

3. What equality law means for you as an employer: pay and benefits.

3. This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

Download resource

4. What equality law means for you as an employer: training, development, promotion and transfer. July 2011 4. Equality Act

This guide is one of a series written by the Equality and Human Rights Commission to explain what you must do to meet the requirements of equality law. These guides support the introduction of the Equality Act 2010. This Act brings together lots of different equality laws, many of which we have had for a long time. By doing this, the Act makes equality law simpler and easier to understand. There are seven guides giving advice on your responsibilities under equality law as someone who has other people working for you whether they are employees or in another legal relationship to you.

Download resource

Pages

Disability Resource Centre 2012 -  The Disability Resource Centre is a Registered Charity (No 1034581) and a Company Limited by Guarantee (No 2897250)